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The Powhatans and the English in the Seventeenth Century Chesapeake is a module in Oxford University Press’s new series, Debating American History. This series embraces an argument-based model for teaching history and encourages students to participate in a contested, evidence-based discourse about the human past.  The series rejects the idea of history as an undisputed narrative and instead presents the past as understood through the direct engagement  with historical evidence.  This book asks a question that historians debate—How were the English able to displace the thriving Powhatan people from their Chesapeake homelands in the seventeenth century?—and provides  abundant primary sources so that students can make their own efforts at interpreting the evidence. They can then use that analysis to construct answers to the key question and argue in support of their position. Through this process, students develop the dispositions and habits of mind that are central to the discipline of history.

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The Powhatans and the English in the Seventeenth Century Chesapeake is a module in Oxford University Press’s new series, Debating American History. This series embraces an argument-based model for teaching history and encourages students to participate in a contested, evidence-based discourse about the human past.  The series rejects the idea of history as an undisputed narrative and instead presents the past as understood through the ...

Oxford University Press announces a new Video and Image Library to accompany all of its US History titles, ready for Fall Semester 2017. Each video was custom produced for OUP, and runs between 2 and 3 minutes, with topics that range from “The Life and Death of John Brown” to “The Disco Wars”. The Image Library includes over 2000 images, organized by period, topic, and region. These materials will provide dynamic teaching ...

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